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Drug-Resistant Strain of Syphilis Emerging Globally

It’s more important this day and age to practice safe sex as incurable STDs become more prevalent. Syphilis is one of the most devastating sexually transmitted infections and until now has been completely curable.  However, doctors around the globe have begun to notice a new antibiotic-resistant strain of the bacteria is emerging and the problem could have serious consequences for many. Continue reading “Drug-Resistant Strain of Syphilis Emerging Globally” »

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February is National Condom Month

February is recognized as National Condom Month in the United States. Originally started on a university campus, it has grown into an educational event that benefits high schools, colleges, AIDS groups, sexually transmitted disease awareness groups and family planning centers.  Continue reading “February is National Condom Month” »

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Does a Pap Smear Test for STDs?

Not a Simple Yes or No Answer

Many women think that their doctors are testing them for STDs as part of their annual physical exams. However, that is not the case. Just because you’re getting a Pap smear and a pelvic exam, it does not mean that you’re getting tested for STDs.A female doctor set in her office

Certain types of Pap smear include HPV testing on the sample taken from your cervix, and sometimes damage or swelling from other STDs could show up on your Pap smear.

Comprehensive STD Screening is the Only Way

The only way to test for STDs common in sexually active adults is for a comprehensive test. Diseases such as chlamydia, HIV, gonorrhea, syphilis or herpes can only be screened for by specific tests that target those diseases.

Sometimes people confuse wet mounts with Pap smears. A wet mount is a slide made from a swab of your vagina. The slide shows vaginal infections and other conditions like bacterial vaginosis and trichomoniasis — the most common STD in young women.

A Pap smear, in contrast, is a swab of your cervix that a doctor in a pathology lab examines to find signs of cervical cancer. Neither wet mounts nor Pap smears alone can identify most common STDs.

Should I get a Pap smear or an STD test?

If you’re concerned about STDs, you should have a comprehensive STD test because a Pap smear cannot scan for them. Pap smears are still very important for detecting cervical cancer early. Regular physical exams including Pap smears or STD testing — especially for women with multiple partners — is paramount to maintaining sound reproductive and sexual health.

ARCpoint Labs STD Testing

Some ARCpoint Labs locations offer comprehensive STD screening. To learn more about what services we offer, contact your nearest location today.

 

 

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Tips for Talking to Kids About STDs

One of the hardest things about raising kids is making sure that they get all of the information that they need to make healthy decisions when you’re not around. 84% of American moms report that they want help talking to their children about sexual issues.

For many parents, having a conversation about STDs is very difficult, but making sure that your children are equipped with the facts to make informed decisions is essential.

Fortunately, there are ways to make this difficult conversation go smoothly. Let’s take a look at a few tips that can help.

Continue reading “Tips for Talking to Kids About STDs” »

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Top STD Myths Debunked

STDs are a taboo subject for a lot of people. Many people do not feel comfortable discussing this subject with their partners or children, which leads not only to a proliferation of misinformation, but of STDs themselves.

The best way to protect yourself from STDs is to get the facts and bust the myths. ARCpoint Labs is here to help you do just that.

Continue reading “Top STD Myths Debunked” »

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What STDs Are Spread Through Blood?

You probably already know that STDs are transmitted through sexual contact. But did you know that some STDs can be transmitted through contact with blood?

Join ARCpoint Labs today as we share important information about bloodborne viruses (BBVs). We’ll also look at ways that you can protect yourself.

Continue reading “What STDs Are Spread Through Blood?” »

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Four Reasons You Need to Get Tested for HIV Today

Affordable HIV testing services | ARCpoint Labs

All too often, people only think about the fun part of having sex, not the repercussions. Engaging in sexual relationships comes with many responsibilities that people often fail to think about.

One responsibility that comes with sex is keeping yourself and others free from harmful diseases such as HIV. According to some reports, as many as 20 percent of the people who have HIV don’t know it.

Fortunately, people can pursue HIV testing to help combat the spread of this potentially devastating disease. Here are some reasons why HIV testing is so vital for safeguarding your health.

Continue reading “Four Reasons You Need to Get Tested for HIV Today” »

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CDC Reports 2012 STD Rates on the Rise

Each year, the Center for Disease Control (CDC) releases its report revealing past STD rates, patterns, and observations. This January 2014, the full 2012 STD report came out, revealing that STD rates are on the rise nationally.

By viewing and understanding these STD rates, health care providers can predict trends for the upcoming year, helping them better adjust treatment plans and educational outreach.

How did STD rates change from 2011 to 2012? And what are some steps to prevent the spread of STDs, according to the CDC? Here are the facts.

2012 STD Rates

Because data on other STDs such as herpes, trichomoniasis, and human papillomavirus (HPV) often go unreported, the CDC’s 2012 report focuses on chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis. Despite their higher report rates, many cases of these STDs also go undiagnosed and thus unreported — which means that the CDC’s report reveals only a hint of the reality of STDs in America.

STD Rates on the Rise

Compared to 2011, the 2012 STD rates all increased except for congenital syphilis:

  • ARCpoint Labs | CDC Reports 2012 STD Rates on the RiseChlamydia: 1,422,976 cases reported in 2012 compared to 1,412,791 in 2011, with the STD rates per 100,000 people increased by 0.7%
  • Gonorrhea: 334,826 cases reported in 2012 compared to 321,849 in 2011, with the STD rates per 100,000 people increased by 4.1% in the third consecutive year of rising rates
  • Syphilis (primary & secondary): 15,667 cases reported in 2012 compared to 13,970 in 2011 with the STD rates per 100,000 people increased 11.1%
  • Syphilis (congenital): 322 cases reported in 2012 compared to 360 in 2011, with the STD rates per 100,000 people decreased by 10%

Groups With the Highest STD rates

STDs can infect anyone, but according to the 2012 data, the following STD rates are highest among certain groups.

Syphilis

Men who have sex with men (MSM) have higher STD rates when it comes to syphilis, making up 75% of all people with the most infectious forms of syphilis (primary and secondary). When the disease in primary or secondary form goes untreated, it can lead to stroke and visual impairment, plus place the infected person at more risk for contracting HIV.

The CDC notes that risk behaviors such as unprotected sex do contribute to these higher levels of syphilis, but also that social factors like lower economic status and the prevalence of homophobia may prevent gay, bisexual, and MSM from seeking treatment for the disease. To stop these rising STD rates, we should focus on eliminating the social stigma linked with syphilis, and also encourage all sexually active gay, bisexual, and MSM to be screened for syphilis, gonorrhea, and HIV at least yearly.

Gonorrhea & Chlamydia

Like in previous years, the 2012 CDC data on STD rates reveals that gonorrhea and chlamydia are most prevalent among Americans ages 15 – 24. Though both young adult men and women are affected by these soaring STD rates, the long-term repercussions are felt more heavily among women who run the risk of infertility due to undiagnosed STDs.

To combat these climbing STD rates, the CDC suggests yearly chlamydia screenings for sexually active women age 25 and under, plus gonorrhea screenings for at-risk women who are sexually active — for example, women with multiple sexual partners, or women who live in areas with high STD rates.

Fight Rising STD Rates With ARCpoint Labs

Worried you may be at risk for STD infection? Combat the inflating STD rates by getting confidential, reliable walk-in STD testing from your local ARCpoint Labs. We offer individual STD testing as well as comprehensive STD panels to detect a variety of diseases.

To lower your risk of STD rates, find the nearest ARCpoint Labs that offers STD testing!

posted by Turn The Page in chlamydia,gonorrhea,HIV,HPV,Public Health,STD Prevention,STD Rates,STD testing,STDs,Syphilis,Trichomoniasis and have No Comments

Why STD Testing is Important for Women

ARCpoint Labs | Why STD Testing is Important for WomenIf you’re a woman who has never contracted an STD, you might wonder why STD testing is important for you. Even if you’ve only slept with a few trusted partners or one person, you can catch an STD without knowing it — even from something so innocent as receiving a kiss on the cheek. Many people are unaware how easy it is to contract an STD, especially from someone who hasn’t completed STD testing and isn’t aware that they have the STD in the first place.

When you consider that more than 110 million Americans have an STD and an estimated 19 million more are infected per year, STD testing doesn’t seem like an unnecessary step. The likelihood that you know someone who currently has an STD constantly rises.

Still, many women think that STDs can’t or won’t happen to them. Wondering why you should consider STD testing? Here’s why.

STD Testing: Why It’s Necessary for Women

Unknowing Carriers

You might think that STD testing isn’t needed because your sexual partner(s) will let you know if they have or have had an STD. But just because someone has an STD doesn’t mean that they know it — only STD testing will reveal the truth. Many STDs have few symptoms or symptoms that are easily confused with other infections, including:

  • GonorrheaGonorrhea symptoms include pain and burning in urination, yellow or bloody discharge, abdominal pain, or heavy menstrual flow. Without STD testing, symptoms of this STD are often confused with bladder infection.
  • Chlamydia: 3/4 of women who have chlamydia exhibit and experience no symptoms, which is why STD testing is vital. Those who do have symptoms may also confuse them with symptoms of a bladder infection — including abnormal discharge from the vaginal, a burning sensation during urination, and spotting between menstruation.
  • Herpes: Symptoms of this STD, including  sores or rashes on your vagina or back, vaginal discharge, headaches, fever, muscle aches, and pain while urinating, may come and go as the years pass. Still, even when you do not exhibit signs of herpes, the virus remains in your nerve cells and can ultimately increase your risk of contracting HIV — which shows why STD testing is so important.
  • HIV: Research has shown that 21% of people in the US who are infected with HIV haven’t undergone STD testing and are thus undiagnosed. HIV symptoms, such as extreme exhaustion, rapid weight loss, fevers, night swears, diarrhea, coughing, and yeast infections, may not appear for years. This means that HIV-positive people could be unknowingly spreading the disease to others.

With STD testing, you will know if you or your sexual partner(s) have contracted any diseases in the past, which will prevent you from further spreading the infection.

Affects of STDs

STD testing does more than prevent the spread of diseases — it can also help you get treatment more quickly, which can prevent your STD from resulting in a very serious health problem. From infertility to cervical cancer to death, there are many long-term medical affects of STDs that can be avoided with simple STD testing. These affects include:

  • Chlamydia: If chlamydia spreads to your uterus or fallopian tubes, it may cause pelvic inflammatory disease, or PID. This disease is not easily cured and can permanently damage your fallopian tubes and uterus, leading to infertility, chronic pelvic pain, or even fatal ectopic pregnancy. After a positive diagnosis through STD testing, you can treat your chlamydia and prevent these outcomes.
  • Herpes: If you give birth vaginally when you have unknowingly carried the herpes virus, your baby could suffer blindness. STD testing is key when it comes to identifying and treating herpes.
  • Genital HPV: Some strains of HPV are linked to an increased risk of cervical cancer, vulvar cancer, vaginal cancer, and anal cancer, all of which have the potential to be fatal. When you and your partner receive STD testing, you can seek treatment for HPV if necessary.
  • HIV: When you contract HIV, your immune system weakens and makes you prone to contracting infections. HIV can lead to AIDS, a severe and often fatal autoimmune disorder. STD testing will help diagnose your HIV — and though there is currently no known cure for the disease, you can seek treatment to slow its progression.

These are just a few of the conditions that can result from STDs — there are countless other affects that could be treated or avoided by STD testing.

Get STD Testing Today

Ready to take charge of your health? ARCpoint Labs offers comprehensive STD testing at many of its facilities nationwide. Click here to see if STD testing is available at the ARCpoint location near you.

posted by Turn The Page in AIDs,chlamydia,genital herpes,gonorrhea,Herpes,HIV,HPV,Relationships and STDs,STD Prevention,STD testing,STDs and have No Comments

Baby Boomers: Do you Have This STD?

The stats are in. Almost 14% of baby boomers have hepatitis C.

When’s the last time you even thought about getting checked for an STD? Well, that’s normal. Most baby boomers don’t think about sexually transmitted diseases.

STDs can still affect baby boomers.

If you haven’t been checked in years, it is definitely time for an STD test. There’s no harm in testing yourself. If you can prevent health complications and reduce the risk of spreading disease, there’s no reason not to do so.

Some STDs are more common in middle-aged and older adults than others. According to researchers from the emergency department at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, baby boomers should watch out for hepatitis C.

The results of their study showed that “the rate of hepatitis C among patients born between 1945 and 1965 was 13.5%”. Researchers were surprised by the high rates, thinking they were in error. The numbers are true.baby boomer couple

Hepatitis C: Serious Business

Hepatitis C isn’t well-known, but the effects of having it linger undetected are serious. When hepatitis C remains undetected in the human body, it can show itself later in even worse health conditions.

Most people who have hepatitis C have no noticeable symptoms. Since it is easy to persist undetected, many people don’t know they’re infected until their health worsens because of the infection. Liver disease, liver cancer and cirrhosis tend to show up years later.

Don’t be a Number: Get Checked for Hepatitis C

We don’t want this 13.5% to stay on an upward trend. Instead, we hope that the recent research is an eye opener to the baby boomer generation, who may have forgotten to be aware of STDs.

Most baby boomers aren’t at high risk now for contracting hepatitis C, but that doesn’t mean they weren’t at an elevated risk in the past. A blood test is all you need to check for the presence of hepatitis C. Find a blood testing location near you to get a simple hepatitis C test and put your mind at ease.

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