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Managing Your STD Risk

June 16-22 marks Healthcare Risk Management Week. One of the most important ways ways to manage health risks is to find ways to lessen your STD risk. ARCpoint Labs is here to help with some ideas to keep you healthy.

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CDC Reports 2012 STD Rates on the Rise

Each year, the Center for Disease Control (CDC) releases its report revealing past STD rates, patterns, and observations. This January 2014, the full 2012 STD report came out, revealing that STD rates are on the rise nationally.

By viewing and understanding these STD rates, health care providers can predict trends for the upcoming year, helping them better adjust treatment plans and educational outreach.

How did STD rates change from 2011 to 2012? And what are some steps to prevent the spread of STDs, according to the CDC? Here are the facts.

2012 STD Rates

Because data on other STDs such as herpes, trichomoniasis, and human papillomavirus (HPV) often go unreported, the CDC’s 2012 report focuses on chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis. Despite their higher report rates, many cases of these STDs also go undiagnosed and thus unreported — which means that the CDC’s report reveals only a hint of the reality of STDs in America.

STD Rates on the Rise

Compared to 2011, the 2012 STD rates all increased except for congenital syphilis:

  • ARCpoint Labs | CDC Reports 2012 STD Rates on the RiseChlamydia: 1,422,976 cases reported in 2012 compared to 1,412,791 in 2011, with the STD rates per 100,000 people increased by 0.7%
  • Gonorrhea: 334,826 cases reported in 2012 compared to 321,849 in 2011, with the STD rates per 100,000 people increased by 4.1% in the third consecutive year of rising rates
  • Syphilis (primary & secondary): 15,667 cases reported in 2012 compared to 13,970 in 2011 with the STD rates per 100,000 people increased 11.1%
  • Syphilis (congenital): 322 cases reported in 2012 compared to 360 in 2011, with the STD rates per 100,000 people decreased by 10%

Groups With the Highest STD rates

STDs can infect anyone, but according to the 2012 data, the following STD rates are highest among certain groups.

Syphilis

Men who have sex with men (MSM) have higher STD rates when it comes to syphilis, making up 75% of all people with the most infectious forms of syphilis (primary and secondary). When the disease in primary or secondary form goes untreated, it can lead to stroke and visual impairment, plus place the infected person at more risk for contracting HIV.

The CDC notes that risk behaviors such as unprotected sex do contribute to these higher levels of syphilis, but also that social factors like lower economic status and the prevalence of homophobia may prevent gay, bisexual, and MSM from seeking treatment for the disease. To stop these rising STD rates, we should focus on eliminating the social stigma linked with syphilis, and also encourage all sexually active gay, bisexual, and MSM to be screened for syphilis, gonorrhea, and HIV at least yearly.

Gonorrhea & Chlamydia

Like in previous years, the 2012 CDC data on STD rates reveals that gonorrhea and chlamydia are most prevalent among Americans ages 15 – 24. Though both young adult men and women are affected by these soaring STD rates, the long-term repercussions are felt more heavily among women who run the risk of infertility due to undiagnosed STDs.

To combat these climbing STD rates, the CDC suggests yearly chlamydia screenings for sexually active women age 25 and under, plus gonorrhea screenings for at-risk women who are sexually active — for example, women with multiple sexual partners, or women who live in areas with high STD rates.

Fight Rising STD Rates With ARCpoint Labs

Worried you may be at risk for STD infection? Combat the inflating STD rates by getting confidential, reliable walk-in STD testing from your local ARCpoint Labs. We offer individual STD testing as well as comprehensive STD panels to detect a variety of diseases.

To lower your risk of STD rates, find the nearest ARCpoint Labs that offers STD testing!

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STD Detectives Take Charge to put end to Gonorrhea Outbreak

Gonorrhea is spreading in the northwest United States. Officials are going to great lengths to put an end to the outbreak, calling on STD detectives to scour for the cause and find more individuals with the infection.

Officials in Oregon, California and Washington are noticing a significant increase in the number of gonorrhea cases reported by hospitals and clinics. The cause has not been determined, but a number of factors are being explored.

What is an STD Detective?detective STD

You might be asking what exactly would be on the job description for an STD detective. An STD detective is not exactly a common role, but it is a real position.

The concept of an STD detective is not new. STD detectives, similar to disease intervention specialists, work to notify people that they may have STDs. In addition to educating the public about sexual health, they encourage people to get tested before disease spreads further.

What’s Causing the Gonorrhea Outbreak?

It’s unlikely that we’ll pinpoint one one cause of the growing number of cases of gonorrhea. Instead, state health officials use existing information to speculate and determine why an outbreak has begun.

Some believe that gonorrhea is being treated improperly or that new strains of the disease are resisting treatment. Others believe that the root cause is a behavior problem, saying that people have gotten complacent about condom usage and protection.

What to do About Gonorrhea

The gonorrhea outbreak in the Northwest is real. STD detectives are scouting out the sources, encouraging people to get tested and offering treatment. In other places across the country, where the numbers of cases aren’t skyrocketing, gonorrhea is still a common STD.

Learning the symptoms and complications is the first step toward preventing the spread of the disease. Since many men may not have symptoms, getting tested for gonorrhea is important.

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September is Prostate Cancer Awareness Month

prostate-cancer-awarenessEach year, the month of September has been set aside in many countries as a prostate cancer awareness month. This is meant to enlighten people about the disease, its causes and ways to prevent it as well as the best way of treating it.

What is prostate cancer?

Prostate cancer refers to a form of cancer which develops in a male gland known as prostate within the reproductive system. Majority of the prostate cancers grow slowly even though there are cases of prostate cancer that are very aggressive. The cells of the cancer may spread to other body parts such as the lymph nodes and the bones from the prostate. It is worth noting that, prostate cancer may result to problems during sexual intercourse, pain, erectile dysfunction or difficulty in urine removal. There are other symptoms which may develop during the disease later stages.

Prostate cancer presence may be shown by symptoms, prostate specific antigen, biopsy or physical examination. The management strategies of this disease should be led by its severity. Majority of the low risk tumors can be followed with active surveillance very safely. Treatments that are meant to cure prostate cancer mainly entails various form of radiation therapy, surgery or less commonly used treatment that involves hormonal therapy, cryosurgery as well as the chemotherapy which are mainly reserved for advanced case of the disease. The risk of Prostate cancer can as well be reduced by masturbation

Prostate cancer detection rate varies very widely across the world and its frequency of detection is less in East and South Asia. This disease is more likely to develop in men with more than fifty years of age and it is globally among the top causes of cancer in most men. Prostate cancer is also most common in developed countries while as its rate of development is rapidly increasing in developing countries.

However, it is important to note that most men suffering from prostate cancer never have any symptoms, undertake no kind of therapy and eventually die as a result of many other causes that have no relation to prostate cancer. The development of this disease is associated with many factors that include diet and genetics.

The underlying health and age of the man, appearance under the microscope, the metastasis extend level as well as the cancer response to first treatment are very crucial in determining the result of the disease. patient.

Visit the Prostate Cancer Foundation for more information on spreading the awareness.

 

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